A Management Problem

This … disgusts me:

What if you lived in a world where every kid got tested for potential depression when they were in elementary school? This video, from Binghamton University, describes new research on how we’d do it.

The researchers created a test that’s designed to determine whether children of depressive parents will also suffer from depression. So the researchers took children of depressed mothers and showed them pictures of people expressing different emotions. Based on previous research, Binghamton University psychology researcher Brandon Gibb and his colleagues believe that children whose pupils dilate when they see a sad face are more prone to depression. That’s because pupil dilation is an empathy response. [Emphasis mine — CHF]

Now, aside from utilitarian objection of asking already overloaded teachers, social workers, child protection people, police, and so forth, to do more — and to do work they simply are not trained or competent to do — I have one real simple problem with this idea.

It turns something which demonstrates compassion and care for others into a problem. A diagnosis.

And the machinery that will roar into action in order to deal with this “problem” — for this turns empathy into a problem to be solved — will be about as kind and compassionate as every other institutional response to the truly human. Which is to say, it will at best be callous. At worst, deeply  and brutally cruel.

Humanity already has enough problems valuing empathy and compassion. We like to claim we do, but we don’t, not really. (Yes, the Upland, California, I grew up in may have been a egregious example of a place and a people who really did not value these things.) We tend to abuse and brutalize those who feel anything, or feel anything more, than they are supposed to.

And don’t tell me that an empathy reaction as a sign of possible future depression isn’t going to problematized, and those who respond in this very human way won’t be somehow stigmatized. Because that’s what our institutions do best — they brutalize and marginalize and stigmatize the weakest and most vulnerable. Because they create the weakest and most vulnerable.

I know some good progressive-slash-liberal out there thinks this is a really swell idea. A compassionate idea designed to reduce or prevent future suffering. The problem is, progressivism-slash-liberalism, in nearly all its guises, has striven to reduce human caring to a scientifically regimented and guided profession, to be done only by trained professionals. Because actual human feeling gets in the way of properly managing human beings.

Or of being properly managed.

The progressive view is a handmaiden to neoliberalism, which reduces (or is trying mightily to reduce) all human relationships to commercial transactions. They empower each other, though progressivism gets the raw end of the deal, as neoliberalism doesn’t need the nonsense progressives peddle in order to turn everything into a commercial exchange, measurable and valued solely by the market. But this doesn’t stop progressives, who at heart all want a well-managed society. The care we have for each other cannot be measured or monetized or regulated unless its done solely (or mainly) by caring professionals — doctors, teachers, social workers, administrators (and in this ugly scheme of things, pastors). Which is why people should not be allowed to care for each other. That’s the purview of professionals, and only they can be trusted to actually care.

The rest of us exist only to be beaten or medicated or propagandized into a passive and consumptive stupor.

If there is an emphatic reason I support something akin to The Benedict Option it is that we who are called by Jesus to follow are also called to create an “economy” in which money plays no role in determining value — of what is exchanged, or of ourselves, as human beings and children of God. In which we care for and support each other as human beings without regard to the market or the state. That our very human emotions, our weaknesses and our frailties and our brokenness, matter.

That we are more than things to be managed.

3 thoughts on “A Management Problem

  1. I saw Inside Out recently (why are kids movies often better than adults?). One of the most profound take aways of that film is sadness has its place in human life, and the constant need for happiness can be bullying. I know in my own life that has been true. There’s a place for Piglet, and Eyeore too.

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